TIFF vs. JPG


posted on 15th of august, 2010

Hi everyone!

I am wondering about the difference between TIFF and JPG. We all load up JPGs to Dreamstime and the downloadable TIFFs were generated from these uploaded JPGs by Dreamstime. What I do not understand is how it comes that TIFFs have more pixels than the underlaying maximum format JPGs, for example

JPG: 3944x3042px
TIF: 5091x3927px




















or

JPG: 4288x2848px
TIF: 6064x4028px























Is there anyone who can explain that to me?

Comments (2)

Posted by Fotodesignjegg on August 15, 2010
Dear Cristalloid,

first of all in general it makes no sense to transform a jpg file into a .tiff file, because the .jpg file format is a format where image information is lost.

The .tiff is a lossless image format.

If the .tiff version has a higher resolution, than your original .jpg file was enlarged. There are also some other agencies which are doing that, so it is, let me say a little common, but not all agencies are doing it.

The only logical reason for saving the enlarged .jpg files as as .tiff files is, to stop the loss of image quality by using twice the .jpg compression algorithm.

I hope this was helpful for you.
Bye
Roger
Posted by Bradcalkins on August 15, 2010
See comments from the admins in this thread: thread on TIFFs

They are upsized from the JPGs.



This article has been read 1268 times.

Continuous improving image quality


posted on 29th of august, 2010

Generally spoken with every new generation of (digital) cameras there is an improvement of technical image quality (better colours, less noise and other artifacts etc.):
From my point of view in this context after some time it makes sense to shoot the same motifs again with better gear and upload these new images because our customers want (in most cases, if not all) the best quality. On the other hand the consequence of this is, that our customers will find nearly the same image several times in the data bank what makes it difficult for them to decide what image to take. And: at some point reviewers will refuse new images even if they are much better technically than the existing ones with the words "We have too many similar images already. Please perform a search on the subject before uploading, to...

[ Read more... ]
Comments (3)

Posted by Frui on August 30, 2010
Expiration date seems to be not so clear becouse some people might, as before, upload photos taken with older cameras, and their works might still comply with conditions of minimal quality.

Maybe try to add in background silhouette of lizard or frog, you will gain more unique look? :-)
Posted by Cristalloid on August 29, 2010
Hello Heywoody, I think that the approach you named isn't really practicable because in a data bank of more than 9000000 images EVERY motif is covered more than good...
Posted by Heywoody on August 29, 2010
I agree it's valid especially if replacing an older, inferior version. However, a better approach might be to do new stuff that is not so well covered ;-)



This article has been read 509 times. 2 readers have found this article useful.

About me


confidential info

Blogs Exclusive user
Archive
2014
January (1)
2013
2012
2011
2010

Stock Photography that BLOGS!

Interact, make friends, share tips and techniques, have fun. Dreamstime wants your ideas and thoughts whether you are a photographer, designer or regular user. Create a blog to tell your story, promote favorite images and photographers, post tutorials or simply exchange opinions with your with fellow dreamstimers.

Don't forget words and pictures go great together so make sure you choose some Dreamstime favorite pics to brighten your article. For inspiration, check out the hottest or the most useful blogs on the left.

Create a blog to tell your story, promote favorite stock images and photographers

Create your blog

My favorite articles

    None

More favorite articles

Related image searches

continuous improving image quality expiry

Continuous related stock images