GET TO KNOW THE BIRDS OF TURKEY - 3


posted on 3rd of june, 2013

Hi folks,

This week’s bird is a species very common in Turkey.

Eurasian Jay – Garrulus glandarius

The Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) is a species of bird occurring over a vast region from Western Europe and north-west Africa to the Indian Subcontinent and further to the eastern seaboard of Asia and down into south-east Asia. Across its vast range, several very distinct racial forms have evolved to look very different from each other, especially when forms at the extremes of its range are compared.

The bird is called jay, without any epithets, by English speakers in Great Britain and Ireland. It is the original 'jay' after which all others are named.

A member of the widespread jay group, and about the size of the Jackdaw, it inhabits mixed woodland, particularly with oaks, and is an habitual acorn hoarder. In recent years, the bird has begun to migrate into urban areas, possibly as a result of continued erosion of its woodland habitat.

Its usual call is the alarm call which is a harsh, rasping screech and is used upon sighting various predatory animals, but the Jay is well known for its mimicry, often sounding so like a different species that it is virtually impossible to distinguish its true identity unless the Jay is seen. It will even imitate the sound of the bird it is attacking, such as a Tawny Owl, which it does mercilessly if attacking during the day. However, the Jay is a potential prey item for owls at night and other birds of prey such as Goshawks and Peregrines during the day.

Feeding in both trees and on the ground, it takes a wide range of invertebrates including many pest insects, acorns (oak seeds, which it buries for use during winter), beech mast and other seeds, fruits such as blackberries and rowan berries, young birds and eggs and small rodents.

It nests in trees or large shrubs laying usually 4–6 eggs that hatch after 16–19 days and are fledged generally after 21–23 days. Both sexes typically feed the young.

References:
Wikipedia - www.wikipedia.org
Birdguides - www.birdguides.com
Trakus - www.trakus.org

Hope to meet you again with a new species next week.
Cheers.
Caglar

Comments (1)

Posted by Egomezta on June 04, 2013
Thanks for sharing.



This article has been read 431 times.
Photo credits: Caglar Gungor.

About me

Caglar is a wildlife photographer. Based in Izmir, Turkey, he travels very often to take wildlife pictures. His works have been published in some local magazines and displayed all over the country. He loves wildlife photography. Birds are his favorites.

(Hyperbiker)
Izmir, TR

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