Polarizer filter, if you want stunning blue skies!


posted on 8th of july, 2013



A lot of people ask me how I get the sky in my images to be so blue. While there are many variables involved in making the sky look natural, a polarizing filter can actually make the sky look more dramatic, and it's easy to learn how to use it properly.



Basically, a polarizer can reduce reflections from objects such as water and glass and can be used to darken the sky and bring out the clouds, making the scene look much more vivid. It can also help reduce haze. For all normal lenses that have a filter thread in the front, you can get a circular polarizing filter, also known as a “circular polarizer”. A circular polarizer is very easy to use and once you attach it on the front of your lens, all you need to do is rotate it clockwise or counter-clockwise to get a different amount of polarization.

Rotating a polarizer allows certain types of light waves to pass through, while blocking other ranges of light waves. This way, you can turn a sky from light blue to very dark blue or increase/decrease reflections by simply rotating the filter. For anyone taking landscape images, I can highly recommend this filter!

Comments (20)

Posted by Bradcalkins on July 23, 2013
The other thing I like about a polarizer is that it decreases the dynamic range by reducing the highlights. Typically, you have to boost exposure which means shadows get more detail in them. Polarizers always sound like they must be too good to be true!
Posted by Coastalprints on July 22, 2013
Two Important notes to add. 1. Beware if using a standard lens cap on the low profile filters as the retaining clips can easily push against the filter and break it (I found out the hard way twice before finding the problem). 2. I was so happy with the effect of the Hoya Pro 1D filters that I splashed out and bought a B&W Circ Polarising filter that comes with a slip on cap to fix the problem and it actually performs even better much like trying on a pair of expensive sunglasses compared to cheaper ones. I now have to "back off" the effect sometimes as it can get a bit oversaturated.
Posted by Serjedi on July 16, 2013
thanks for sharing!
Posted by Maxyone73 on July 15, 2013
@Robinstockphotos from what I know (if things have not changed in the past 2 years) Hoya and Kenko are the same and they share the same website. In Japan they are more famous as Kenko, outside Japan as Hoya. http://www.thkphoto.com/
Posted by 4harmony on July 14, 2013
Thank you. I will put this on my wish list!
Posted by Silvastrings on July 14, 2013
Great images, thanks for the tips!!
Posted by Celiaak on July 12, 2013
Great to know.
Posted by Lenutaidi on July 11, 2013
Useful,thanks for sharing.
Posted by Laurasinelle on July 11, 2013
Thanks for sharing, nice images!
Posted by Egomezta on July 11, 2013
GReat info, thanks for sharing.
Posted by Hanmon on July 11, 2013
I always use the polarizing filter by blue sky
Posted by Tomatika on July 10, 2013
Thank you for sharing.
Posted by Zenonk on July 10, 2013
It works great as long as air quality is good, in most of polluted city centers it will bring less effect.
Posted by Alvera on July 09, 2013
Which would be better? A Kenko Wide band 58mm or a Hoya Pro1 58mm? (circular)
The Hoya is more expensive. But technical specs make the Kenko a better one. I'm still unable to decide because I'm too far to be able to test them. So I'll have to order them directly....

Which one do you use and how much did it cost?

Go on Kenko. Tryed a Hoya vs Kenko and can't see any difference, at least at my equipment.
Posted by Alvera on July 09, 2013
   Windmill turbine green energy   

This blue is with a Kenko polarizer filter. No way to obtain this in post processing.
Posted by Nansaidh on July 09, 2013
Thanks for the comments! My filter is a Hoya, I don't believe it was more than $40, I bought it years ago! Use it all the time::
Posted by Suyerry on July 09, 2013
Beautiful photos, especially the rose covered shed...love it!
Posted by Famed01 on July 09, 2013
Great post!!! I always use the polarizing filter for landscape photos
Posted by Robinstockphotos on July 09, 2013
Which would be better? A Kenko Wide band 58mm or a Hoya Pro1 58mm? (circular)
The Hoya is more expensive. But technical specs make the Kenko a better one. I'm still unable to decide because I'm too far to be able to test them. So I'll have to order them directly....

Which one do you use and how much did it cost?
Posted by Mike2focus on July 08, 2013
Great info. Thanks! Will have to try this filter.



Comments (20)

This article has been read 1020 times. 9 readers have found this article useful.
Photo credits: Nancy Ziller.

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