Space Management - III


posted on 22nd of february, 2008

I have discussed the space definition and camera position relative to space. In this one I have wrote my ideas regarding the lenses and how they affect the spce, wide angle and telephoto lens.

When we use a wide-angle lens, we are expanding all visually space. For creating visual depth, the expansion supports the concept of layering by extending all the spaces. The visual expansion of space is based directly on distance relationships, between elements in the frame and the camera's position. If the elements are equal-distant from the camera's position, no visual expansion between elements will result. The wide field of view, allows all elements to appear further, but no visual expansion occurs. When the distance relationship changes, and one element exists closer to the camera's position than another, expansion results. The larger the distance relationship becomes, the more expansion occurs. Simply put, elements that exist closer to camera become relatively larger visually, compared with elements that exist further from the camera. This distance and expansion relationship is fluid, depending on how wide the, focal length is.
There are other characteristics; we may perceive as negative, using a wide-angle lens is that image space has a bigger view. If we aren't aware, other elements may be included that might not support the image concept. When the image space is being stretched, the elements become visually distorted. Sometimes the distortion of certain objects doesn't feel appropriate or look natural to our eyes. This may become a distraction.




The visual compression of space with a telephoto lens is also based directly on distance relationships, between elements in the frame and the camera's position. If the elements are equal-distant from the camera's position, no visual compression between elements will result. The narrow field of view allows elements to appear closer, but no visual compression occurs. When the distance relationship between elements changes and one element, exists closer to the camera's position than another element, visual compression results. The larger the distance relationship becomes, the more compression occurs. Simply put, elements that exist further from camera become relatively larger visually, compared with elements that exist closer to the camera. This distance and compression relationship is also fluid, depending on how long the focal length is.
The most beneficial characteristic of these lenses is the field of view allows us to isolate the positive/negative space, more easily, to support the concepts of layering. In large or complex scenes, our ability to compose, by moving around and getting close to these spaces can be difficult or impossible. With long focal lengths, we can appear to be closer, without moving very far. Bonus!
The most challenging aspect of this lens, the inherent compression, seems somewhat counterintuitive in supporting the concepts of layering. But, if we think about the distance relationships of space using this lens, the elements (positive or negative), further from the camera become visually larger compared to elements that are closer. The lens is expanding space through compression, what a concept! We can use this relationship to our advantage by maximizing the size and importance of the space, further from us, which supports the concept of layering.
Two general thoughts on choosing a lens to shoot with:
•To bring more attention to close subjects a shorter focal length lens will be useful.
•To bring more visual attention to far subjects a longer focal length lens would be beneficial.

Comments (1)

Posted by Helioshelen on February 22, 2008
....tanks for yor optimal tutorial!



This article has been read 1234 times. 1 readers have found this article useful.
Photo credits: Arindom Chowdhury.

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The camera looks both ways; in revealing the subject, you are also revealing a part of yourself. I shoot with feeling, I shoot with passion and ... aboveall, I shoot for myself.

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Bangalore, IN

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